She Demons – Lobby Cards (1-8)

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She Demons (1958)

Directed by Richard E. Cunha
Written by H.E. Barrie and Richard E. Cunha
Starring Rudolph Anders, Irish McCalla, Tod Griffin, Leni Tana, Victor Sen Yung, Gene Roth, and Charles Opunui

The English language is cluttered with phrases like “too much of a good thing” and “everything but the kitchen sink”. These perfectly describe why I love She Demons, because if it wasn’t so over-stuffed with cliches that pay it probably wouldn’t be interesting all. It’s as though the creators couldn’t decide what story to tell and went with everything.

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Coming Attraction: Itsy Bitsy (2018)

The Itsy Bitsy trailer is out, and I have to say that I’m intrigued. It sounds like the giant spider comes with some mythology, which could give it a really cool feel compared to most spider films. The trailer hints at it being sort of a dark fairy, and I really hope that’s not too misleading. Anyway, always glad see a new theatrical release in my favorite monster category!

Recommended Films About Island Experiments

The Island Experiments theme is all about mad science, just in a specific remote location. But what turns ordinary, ill-advised science mad? The movies I’ve selected all feature monsters created by scientists. Their motivations may differ — and in one case the creature was even an accident — but in every case it is the scientist who built the beast!

The five films I’ve selected vary in quality and tone. I wanted to pick movies that I love that aren’t necessarily well-known to casual viewers. Hence, an older classic and some interesting ones from a bit more recently.

Genre fans have likely heard about most of these, if not seen them already. You may have other preferences (obscure or popular), and I invite you to share them! Add them in the comments, and let everyone know what other Island Experiments films they should check out!


The Flesh Eaters
Dir. Jack Curtis

A fun under-seen creature-features from the early 1960s. Martin Kosleck plays a Nazi scientist, living on a remote island to carry on experiments to weaponize flesh-eating microbes. When a small plane is forced to land due to mechanical problems, a pounding rainstorm is the least of their problems.

Lo-fi special effects, but surprisingly gory in parts. Lots of spousal arguing. Watch it for Kosleck and the microbes’ final attack.

87 min., b&w, 1964
No MPAA rating

 


Island of Lost Souls
Dir. Erle C. Kenton

When you think of 1930s horror, Universal’s monster movies are inescapable. But it was Paramount that produced this moody adaptation of The Island of Dr. Moreau (the first film version with sound). Charles Laughton and Bela Lugosi anchor the cast as Moreau and his Sayer of the Law, and Kathleen Burke’s Panther Woman is nearly as iconic as Dracula and Frankenstein.

Though there are some light prosthetics and hair applications, this is not really a movie about effects. It’s driven by character and mood.

70 min., b&w, 1932
Not Rated

 


Island of Terror
Dir. Terence Fisher

An accident in a research lab creates a bone-eating monster that splits every few hours. In no time the island is swarming with them, forcing the locals to seek shelter in a church. Co-star Peter Cushing and legendary Hammer director Terence Fisher bring class to the independent production.

The creatures are a bit silly but get the job done. The mounting tension leading to a siege is where it’s at.

89 min., color, 1966
No MPAA rating

 


Jurassic Park III
Dir. Joe Johnston

After The Lost World: Jurassic Park ripped off King Kong, this sequel proved that the franchise could still deliver by ripping off the first film. Sam O’Neill leads a team to one of the park’s research islands to help William H. Macy and Téa Leone find their son. It’s a rousing adventure that, while not providing anything new, gives more of what we liked about the original.

The dinosaurs aren’t the surprise they were in Jurassic Park, but it’s still solid work. Expect some moderate gore.

92 min., color, 2001
PG-13

 


Shock Waves
Dir. Ken Wiederhorn

I’m in a minority here, but I really like this one. John Carradine takes a boatload of tourists to a remote island where Peter Cushing is watching over his cache of Nazi zombies. It’s a bit on the tedious side, to be honest, but I love the ending. Wiederhorn’s biggest film would be Return of the Living Dead II, which should lower your expectations appropriately.

There’s very little going on effects-wise, but the zombies are creepy and there are a couple of effective shots of them.

85 min., color, 1977
PG

Monster Island (2004)

Directed by Jack Perez
Written by Adam Glass and Jack Perez
Starring Daniel Letterle, Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Chelan Simmons, Carmen Electra, Adam West, C. Ernst Harth, Alana Husband, La La Anthony, and Nick Carter

The horror movies of the 1950s have a certain cachet, not as exemplary films but as enjoyably cheesy. It’s a nostalgia thing, and it’s no surprise that filmmakers like Larry Blamire have used that as inspiration for their own efforts. Capturing that feeling of how we think movies were is a delicate task, and what is intended as homage can come of as misinformed, disingenuous, and cynical. By way of example, I give you the MTV production, Monster Island.

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